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a culpa não é da internet

por   /  11/01/2011  /  8:30

Não é com um amigo nem com dois que costumo ter conversas sobre como a internet é maravilhosa, mas como também atrapalha a vida da gente em vários sentidos. Nunca antes na história da comunicação se usou tanto a palavra procrastinação, não é verdade? Adoro ler sobre isso. E adorei, também, encontrar um texto que vai contra essa corrente.

Kevin Hartnett decidiu: em 2011, vai parar de culpar a internet por tudo que deixa de fazer.

Leiam > My Resolution for 2011: Stop Blaming the Internet

The Internet was the big bogeyman, the great scapegoat of 2010. In September, I wrote about howsocial networking was perverting my friendships. In October Millions contributor Emily wrote about how it had eroded her attention span. And at a certain point, it seemed like every time my wife and I had friends over the conversation turned to the ways the Web was ruining all of our lives: how it was destroying our productivity, sapping our sex drives, devouring our precious time on earth.

But in 2011, I say enough with all this bellyaching!  The Internet is just a thing that sits on my desk, if it sits anywhere at all.  If I close the lid of my laptop, it can’t get me. If I walk outside it, can’t follow me.  Blaming the Internet for the novel I didn’t write is a little like blaming a plush sofa for the marathon I didn’t run.  Sure, the couch gave me a comfy place to hide while I was busy not being the man I want to be, but it’s hardly the cause of my problems. Replace the couch with a straw mat and suddenly I’ll run 26 miles? I doubt it. Scuttle the Internet and suddenly I’ll be the writer I’ve always dreamed of being? Hardly.

So, my resolution for 2011 is to stop blaming the Internet for all the ways my days go awry.  There are two reasons, abstracted from recent experiences, that make me think this is achievable.

The first is that the Internet is not actually that addictive.  I know we talk about email and Facebook and the latest headlines on ESPN like they’re allurements on par with strippers and cigarettes, but really?  I spent the week around Christmas at my in-laws’ house which is kind of in the woods and where you can’t pick up a wi-fi signal unless you stand with your computer above your head while balanced on the top railing of the porch on a perfectly clear day.  So I didn’t use the Internet much during that time, and if what followed counts as Internet withdrawal, then the Internet is pretty weak sauce indeed.  A few times I fantasized about my inbox filling up with unread emails and on Christmas Day I wished I could have checked the Celtics score. But there were no cold sweats, no shakes or shimmies, no aching in my groin.  What this made me realize is that the Internet does not have a strong magnetic pull of its own.  It’s more like water, ingenious at filling negative space, at seeping into cracks. So in 2011, I’m going to stop fretting over the Internet and instead think about it the way I think about my bathtub: caulk and forget it.

The second experience took place a few days ago. It was in the morning and I was about to sit down to work and I told myself, “Today I’m not going to waste time on the Internet.” I’ve given myself that same pep talk on thousands of mornings but it resounded differently this time: Suddenly it seemed like such a plainly impoverished ambition. “That’s it,” I thought to myself, “That’s all you hope to get out of the day, to not refresh the nytimes.com over and over?” What I realized then is that the opposite of the Internet is not concentration.  That morning I was indeed successful at staying off the Web, but so what? I fiddled with my pen, adjusted my socks, stared out the window, filled and refilled my water bottle, went to the bathroom. It turns out there are a lot of ways to fritter away time that don’t involve a computer screen.

What I’m after—what I think most of us are after—is sustained, focused engagement in a meaningful task.  If only the Internet were the only thing standing between me and that. So, resolved for 2011, no more complaining about the Internet’s role in my life! If failures do happen to accrue this year, I’ll  place the blame instead where it belongs: on my parents.

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A ilustração fofíssima é do Matt Saunders

arte  ·  internet  ·  jornalismo

TEDxAmazônia, alguns vídeos

por   /  10/01/2011  /  8:35

Finalmente coloquei uns vídeos do TEDxAmazônia no YouTube!

Lembram que falei um monte do evento? Se quiserem ler de novo, está aqui > http://donttouchmymoleskine.com/tedxamazonia-2/

Nos vídeos, perguntei umas coisinhas. Me perdoem pela péssima qualidade dos dois primeiros, eu e minha câmera não estávamos nos entendendo bem…

No primeiro, o surfista Sérgio Laus fala sobre a sensação de enfrentar uma pororoca:

No segundo, o Lama Padma Samten fala de budismo e de ir atrás dos nossos sonhos. Aproveitei também pra perguntar o que é o amor pra ele:

No terceiro, um dos caras do Demos Helsinki fala sobre o projeto de felicidade:

amor  ·  etc  ·  fotografia  ·  internet  ·  jornalismo

o guia da festa perfeita

por   /  06/01/2011  /  14:17

Outra matéria que adorei fazer foi O Guia da Festa Perfeita, para a revista Criativa

Ficou enorme, espero que vocês gostem! Vamos por partes:

Os segredos dos festeiros: Fabio Queiroz

Os segredos dos festeiros: Facundo Guerra

Os segredos dos festeiros: Lalai

10 dicas para tirar boas fotos nas festas de fim de ano + 10 dicas para sair bem na foto, por Renata Chebel

Libera DJ! Trilhas para dançar e para relaxar, feitas pela Miss Má

Efeitos especiais na decoração, por Vivianne Pontes

Muito além da cerveja: o mixologista Márcio Silva ensina a preparar drinks deliciosos

Petiscos vapt-vupt: a chef Renata Vanzetto ensina receitas simples e saborosas

Katylene declara: “Eu me divirto em qualquer bagaça!”

escreve escreve  ·  especial don't touch  ·  festa  ·  fotografia  ·  internet  ·  jornalismo  ·  música

dos verbos encantar e ajudar

por   /  05/01/2011  /  17:18

O Columbus Dispatch encontrou um homem sem-teto com uma daquelas vozes de ouro da era do rádio, fez um vídeo e o colocou no YouTube, numa tentativa de encontrar um lugar, um trabalho pra ele. Mais de 4 milhões de visitas depois, o objetivo foi alcançado (mas não encontrei ainda os detalhes).

> Com 9 milhões de acessos online, vídeo rende emprego a sem-teto com vozeirão de locutor

> Ted dá entrevista pra CBS: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BYsEnISr7KU (quem mandou foi o querido Felipe Lins)

O autor do vídeo escreveu a seguinte mensagem:

Well everyone. You can give yourselves and Ted a high-five. He’s being given offers hand-over-fist over the air. He’ll be set for life.

My request to all. Whenever you run across a story such as this, don’t assume it’ll take a life of its own, on its own. It won’t. It can’t. There are too many other stories that drown out the one before it.

You need to spend time to get that story and its word out to many. If you care, you’ll do it.

Keep the faith, pay forward and always lend a hand; even if you’re the one who needs it.

God bless Mr. Williams. I’m sure we’ll be seeing more of him for sometime to come.

Inspirador! ♥ 

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amor  ·  jornalismo  ·  música